Making iOS 12 projects in Xcode 11

Some Xcode 11 iOS project templates aren’t iOS 12 compatible out of the box, but it’s relatively easy to make them work, here’s how:

  1. Select File > New… > Project…
  2. Select iOS and “Single View App” template, for example.
  3. Give the app a name, Swift, and be sure to select “Storyboard”, not “SwiftUI” (which needs some View and some requires iOS 13 according to the error message from Xcode), then select the “Next” to create the project.
  4. Select “AppDelegate.swift” and add @available(iOS 13, *) on the line above each of the func definitions in the “UISceneSession Lifecycle”
  5. Add an implementation of the window property inside the AppDelegate class like so: var window: UIWindow?
  6. Open “SceneDelegate.swift” and add @available(iOS 13, *) on the line above class SceneDelegate
  7. Select the project file in the Project Navigator to edit project settings and select the Project in the left pane of the editor
  8. In the “Info” tab, change the “iOS Deployment Target” at the top of the right pane to the appropriate 12.x deployment target for your project.
  9. Build and Run.  Good to go!

I’ve posted the two edited source files in a gist here

“We need more coders…”

In his excellent post Brandon Sneed responds to GM CEO’s “We need more coders” comment:  “Let’s talk about the real problem…”

I agree with his comments and would add:

Many large companies seem to waste an astonishing amount of developer productivity. So rather than saying they need more developers, these CEOs might start by fixing their current planning, processes, and methods of working.

Canceled projects/features, mismanaged and/or badly planned projects, developer time wasted in meetings they don’t need to be in or badly run meetings, stupid territorial struggles between upper managers, endless re-organizations, etc. etc.

These kind of things all makes developers less efficient which decreases their job satisfaction and makes them less likely to stick around.

Small companies do much much less of this because they simply can’t afford such waste.

One easy test:

If your company has meetings without clear agendas provided >24hrs in advance of the meeting, and shared post-meeting minutes, then you’re likely wasting developer time. A developer can’t know if they need to attend a meeting if they don’t know what it’s about (agenda) or if they feel like they have to be present to know what’s going on (lack of post-meeting minutes).

Attach an agenda to the meeting invite (>24hrs in advance!) and add only those developers (or anyone else for that matter) who you *must* have in the meeting to the TO/required list. Add anyone else who you want to inform about the meeting and what it’s about to the CC/optional list. Before you send the invite, do any pre-meeting work you can that will enable you to move developers (or anyone else) from the TO/required list to the CC/optional list; use email (don’t interrupt developers!) to ask those two questions you need to ask them before the meeting, for example.

See also @rands’ comment here

7DRL Challenge 2016: Arcana Command

My entry in the 2016 7DRL challenge is finished, a mere 1 minute before my time ran out! Arcana Command is based on

Download it here, or keep reading to find out more.

 

Arcana Commander Screenshot

Features:

  • Defend humanity from the mysterious Kyth and their demonic minions
  • Train four different classes of hero
  • Research advanced magic
  • Construct a mighty base of operations
  • Defeat the Kyth on their own turf to win the game
  • Simple controls make the game easy to play
  • Advanced ASCII graphics technology for a modern user experience

Controls:

  • Mouse only
  • Click to select units, click to move, click abilities at the bottom of the screen to use them, click to choose targets
  • Click to switch tabs in HQ
  • Click to select from menus
  • Essentially everything you can do in the game is done by clicking
  • Escape to quit

Known Bugs:

  • No in-game help is available.
  • Completely untested on any platforms other than Mac OS X.

Fix for spinning Pizza in Finder (10.9.5): remove dropbox contextual menus

Got  really tired for seeing the SPOD (Spinning Pizza of Death) in the Finder while trying to navigate in the folder hierarchy.  Happens off and on every 30 seconds or so.  Finally tracked it down to something dumb that Dropbox’s contextual menu code is doing (version 2.10.41).

It’s a bit of a pain to remove but here’s what you need to know:

/Library/DropboxHelperTools/

is where the nasty is.  Contents:

DropboxHelperInstaller
Dropbox_u###/
DropboxBundle.bundle
FinderLoadBundle
mach_inject_bundle_stub.bundle
dbfseventsd

The “###” is the user id number of the current OS X user (probably 501, 502, etc).

You need to move the “DropboxHelperInstaller” out of this folder or it’ll just keep re-installing the other stuff. I didn’t track down which of the two bundles are causing the problem, but it’s one of the “FinderLoadBundle”, or “DropboxBundle.bundle”. I removed both of these and the “mach_inject_bundle_stub.bundle” and that seems to solve the problem (after you quit Dropbox and relaunch the Finder).

Unfortunately Dropbox really wants to repair itself so it will keep prompting you every time it launches to put these back:

Screen Shot 2014-11-07 at 7.44.40 PM

Just select “Cancel” and it won’t be able to put these buggy files back.  Everything except the Finder integration seems to work fine and the Finder doesn’t keep dying inside dropbox contextual menu code for some indeterminate (but too long) amount of time.  I’ve told them on Twitter but they haven’t fixed this yet :-/

UPDATE:  As of Dropbox v2.10.52, and only when running on OS X 10.10.1, there’s a checkbox for “Enable Finder Integration” that might turn this stuff off more easily.  I haven’t tried it yet, but I’m hopeful.

7DRL 2014 – Day 7: In which everything is complete

Trinkets – the roguelike game I’ve spent the past week creating for the 7DRL competition – is finished, about 20 hours before the deadline! It’s a game about wandering an extra dimensional vault, acquiring trinkets and trying to get back home.

A build for mac is available here. Unfortunately, there’s no windows/linux build, but if you’re on one of those operating systems and want to play, the source is available here.

Screen Shot 2014-03-15 at 2.38.31 PM

… which turns out to be entirely justified.

My high score is 59 – can you beat it? If so, let me know in the comments below!

7DRL 2014 – Day 6: In which victory approaches at high velocity

One day remains, and I’m actually almost done. It would be nice to redo the map generator, and game balance can always be tweaked some more, but the plot and endgame are implemented, the boss-fights are done with basic AI, and there’s even a score feature. Shown below is the second of four boss fights:

You have a bad feeling about this level...
You have a bad feeling about this level…
… which turns out to be entirely justified.
… which turns out to be entirely justified.

7DRL 2014 – Day 5: In which parkour is performed in fancy shoes

Today was very productive; I finished the procedural generation of trinkets (for now, at least), improved the magic system, procedurally generated strangely worded descriptions of said trinkets, added new effects including knock-back and circular slide, and added all of the non-boss enemies, including the Abberant visible below:

Image
Parkour shoes acquired!

Shown above is the non-procedurally-generated description of one of the coolest shoe types in the game (thus far, at least). These shoes allow you to run along walls, moving faster than enemies or even jumping over them.

I still have two more days left to go, and quite a bit still to do, including:

  • Plot
  • Victory conditions
  • Boss fights + Boss AI
  • Game balance
  • Prettier maps