Found a file named “Silly Verse for James Dempsey”

April 17, 2016 by

awash in the miasma
of async blocks on dispatch_queues
bad data flyin’ like kids from pews
(when church lets out and they go free)
and to the console logging spews
apocalyptic, no good news
mood turning into plasma

7DRL Challenge 2016: Arcana Command

March 13, 2016 by

My entry in the 2016 7DRL challenge is finished, a mere 1 minute before my time ran out! Arcana Command is based on

Download it here, or keep reading to find out more.

 

Arcana Commander Screenshot

Features:

  • Defend humanity from the mysterious Kyth and their demonic minions
  • Train four different classes of hero
  • Research advanced magic
  • Construct a mighty base of operations
  • Defeat the Kyth on their own turf to win the game
  • Simple controls make the game easy to play
  • Advanced ASCII graphics technology for a modern user experience

Controls:

  • Mouse only
  • Click to select units, click to move, click abilities at the bottom of the screen to use them, click to choose targets
  • Click to switch tabs in HQ
  • Click to select from menus
  • Essentially everything you can do in the game is done by clicking
  • Escape to quit

Known Bugs:

  • No in-game help is available.
  • Completely untested on any platforms other than Mac OS X.

Tax Time: Retirement plan for Indies

February 21, 2016 by

Tax Time here in the U S of A.   This post is for self-employeed and small business owners in the USA but does not constitute tax advice – you should consult a qualified licensed/certified tax professional – but is just some information to help you ask them some leading questions and pointers to documentation on the IRS.gov website for educational purposes.

π

As I’m calculating the basis in my SEP-IRA due to some conversions of IRA to ROTH IRA, I’m reminded that I lost out on about 10 years of pre-tax retirement savings due to a bad CPA who said I wasn’t eligible to do so since it was an S-Corp.  Got a new CPA and found out the first one was wrong (or the law changed and he was wrong at first but didn’t inform me that it had changed).

I suggest you educate yourself by starting at IRS.gov SEP FAQs and learn enough to ask the questions I should have:-/

The great thing about a SEP-IRA, for an S-Corp anyway (not sure about LLCs or sole-proprietors), is that the business makes the contributions for the employee and these contributions are deductible business expenses.

The limits are also a LOT higher than you as an individual have.  From an FAQ sub-page linked to from the one above:

How much can I contribute to my SEP?

The contributions you make to each employee’s SEP-IRA each year cannot exceed the lesser of:

  1. 25% of compensation, or
  2. $53,000 (for 2015 and 2016 and subject to annual cost-of-living adjustments for later years).

These limits apply to contributions you make for your employees to all defined contribution plans, which includes SEPs. Compensation up to $265,000 in 2015 and 2016 and subject to cost-of-living adjustments for later years) of an employee’s compensation may be considered. If you’re self-employed, use a special calculation to determine contributions for yourself.

So if you’re making more than $72,000 a year you can start to exceed the $18,000 personal contribution limit to a SEP-IRA or 401K.

This makes it sound like you don’t have to be a Corporation (but read Publication 560 & ask your CPA):

How much can I contribute if I’m self-employed?

The same limits on contributions made to employees’ SEP-IRAs also apply to contributions if you are self-employed. However, special rules apply when figuring the maximum deductible contribution. See Publication 560 for details on determining the contribution amount.

The only real down-side that I’m aware of (again, consult your hopefully better-than-my-old-CPA CPA) is that you make this contribution for all employees who meet the criterion you set in the SEP Plan Document.  The IRS has a “model SEP plan document”, form 5305-SEP that I used and that might be enough for you.  See the details/restrictions here.

My company mostly used contractors and I set the requirement to full-time employment for 3 years which was likely to exclude all but the most dedicated and valuable employees (and which I already qualified for :)).

On the other hand, having a good retirement plan that is competitive with with a big company’s 401K plan might help you attract employees that you otherwise couldn’t, so you might want eligibility that let’s employees participate as soon as they’ve passed some introductory trial period (90 or 180 days or whatever).  Notice that the limits for the SEP-IRA are actually higher than those for a 401K plan once compensation crosses the $72,000/year threshold.  So you can actually provide a more aggressive retirement plan with a SEP-IRA plan than with that big company 401K plan (unless I’m missing something).

And the employee can also make a ROTH IRA contribution as well (subject to the usual ROTH IRA contribution limits).

A SEP-IRA is cheaper to operate than a 401K plan (which is complicated enough that you have to pay a service to operate it for you – and they aren’t cheap).  Your employees can open their own SEP-IRA account and your business simply deposits money into it.  (See the IRS site for details).

Over the 10 years I was operating with the bad CPA I could have saved a lot more for retirement than the ~$4000-$5000 ROTH IRA limit, if only I’d known….   Now you know.

Go forth and save those pre-tax dollars for retirement!

Your 50-year-old self will thank you.  :-D

 

This is not tax advice. All readers should consult a qualified tax professional about any tax decisions they make for themselves or their business.

Game for getting your child to dress themselves in the morning

January 6, 2016 by

Here’s a game we used to get Geek to get himself dressed and moving in the morning.

I’d lay his clothes out flat on the floor to make a path of clothing from his bed to the door of his room. Then tell him that the game was to see if he could make it to the door getting dressed as he went without touching the floor. When he picks up a piece of clothing he has to put it on.

The first day they were in a mostly reasonable order – one that matched the order you’d put your clothes on. When he completed that successfully I congratulated him and said that tomorrow would be more tricky (build anticipation for getting out of bed and getting dressed!😉 ).

The second day the order was such that he had to hop past some pieces and then jump back and then jump forward in order to get the underwear on under the pants, for example.

And you can increase the difficulty to get it interesting. One day I made it essentially impossible and we laughed a lot and then I asked him what two items of clothing could switch with each other to make it possible (teaching programming/algorithms/puzzle solving) and then did the one he picked so that he could get out the door.

Didn’t take long before he was in the habit of getting dressed and moving in the morning and was fun instead of a struggle.

7DRL Challenge 2015: Deathdealer

March 15, 2015 by

My entry into the 2015 Seven-Day Roguelike Challenge is complete! Deathdealer, an arena combat roguelike with trading card game mechanics, is finished and available for you to play.

Screen Shot 2015-03-15 at 1.43.42 PM

Features:

  • Survive as long as possible against endless waves of fiendishly difficult enemies
  • Mix and match three schools of magic
  • Customize your character’s deck from 69 different cards
  • Vanquish 32 types of enemies, including 6 absurdly lethal boss monsters
  • Unlock new cards every 5 waves to expand your capabilities
  • Simple controls make the game easy to play
  • Advanced ASCII graphics technology for a modern user experience

Controls:

  • WASD, arrow keys, or vi-keys to move or use menus
  • 1-7 to cast spells from your hand
  • Tab to view enemy information
  • Spacebar or period to wait one turn, to make selections in menus, or to exit the deck builder
  • + and – to add or remove cards from your deck
  • Escape to quit

Known Bugs:

  • Enemy pathfinding is rather weak.
  • Minimum deck size of 20 cards is not enforced, and issues may occur with decks of 7 or fewer cards; please make your decks contain at least 20 cards.
  • No in-game help is available.
  • Completely untested on any platforms other than Mac OS X.

Download Deathdealer for Mac OS X here, or the python source (for any platform with Python) here.

iWork ’09 and .docx files

February 24, 2015 by

If you happen to rebuild a mac and put 10.9.5 on it and you install iWork ’09 from an older CD/DVD so you get iWork 9.0, you will find that you cannot open .docx files.

Going to the AppStore is fruitless – just wants to get you to update to the current versions of Pages (the rewrite) and then tells you that you have an incompatible system (requires OS X 10.10 or later).  It doesn’t offer to update you to the updates for iWork ’09 that you may have been offered back when you first installed iWork and before the new iWork apps came out.

The solution is to get the updater from Apple’s Support area (search for “iWork 09 update”).  Here’s a link to the newest we found (9.3).

Dad’s dad just recalled a prank I (apparently) did at a young age…

December 19, 2014 by

Funny to have Dad’s dad talk about stepping on Legos and then recall this other event which I swear I don’t remember doing, but I would have been younger than 7 when this is purported to have happened:

Then there was the Sat morning when I heard massive giggles from the hall,
went out to see and slipped on the Crisco-greased floor one (or both) of you
had so much fun creating…  :-)

It is amazing I survived you kids!

Gladdens my heart to hear I (with help & encouragement from my nearest sister I’m sure) was keeping him on is toes* at such a young age…  :-P

Geek was so much more well behaved than I, sadly.  I have no recollection of him playing such pranks (though the empty milk carton put back into the fridge was pretty funny).

*or perhaps “off his toes” would be more accurate…

Fix for spinning Pizza in Finder (10.9.5): remove dropbox contextual menus

November 7, 2014 by

Got  really tired for seeing the SPOD (Spinning Pizza of Death) in the Finder while trying to navigate in the folder hierarchy.  Happens off and on every 30 seconds or so.  Finally tracked it down to something dumb that Dropbox’s contextual menu code is doing (version 2.10.41).

It’s a bit of a pain to remove but here’s what you need to know:

/Library/DropboxHelperTools/

is where the nasty is.  Contents:

DropboxHelperInstaller
Dropbox_u###/
DropboxBundle.bundle
FinderLoadBundle
mach_inject_bundle_stub.bundle
dbfseventsd

The “###” is the user id number of the current OS X user (probably 501, 502, etc).

You need to move the “DropboxHelperInstaller” out of this folder or it’ll just keep re-installing the other stuff. I didn’t track down which of the two bundles are causing the problem, but it’s one of the “FinderLoadBundle”, or “DropboxBundle.bundle”. I removed both of these and the “mach_inject_bundle_stub.bundle” and that seems to solve the problem (after you quit Dropbox and relaunch the Finder).

Unfortunately Dropbox really wants to repair itself so it will keep prompting you every time it launches to put these back:

Screen Shot 2014-11-07 at 7.44.40 PM

Just select “Cancel” and it won’t be able to put these buggy files back.  Everything except the Finder integration seems to work fine and the Finder doesn’t keep dying inside dropbox contextual menu code for some indeterminate (but too long) amount of time.  I’ve told them on Twitter but they haven’t fixed this yet:-/

UPDATE:  As of Dropbox v2.10.52, and only when running on OS X 10.10.1, there’s a checkbox for “Enable Finder Integration” that might turn this stuff off more easily.  I haven’t tried it yet, but I’m hopeful.

Objective C Builder Pattern play

April 12, 2014 by

So I read two posts on the Builder Pattern from Java today that got linked to off of Twitter.

This by Klaas Pieter which referenced this one by Uli Kusterer.  Both good articles.

I haven’t done Java much at all for the last 10 years and so am not used to this pattern, but I thought about how I might do something similar and while I’m not sure my first thought is any better, it seems to meet the requirements and/or benefits noted by the two blog posts in question and the tweet discussion referencing them.

Instead of:

 Pizza pizza = new Pizza.Builder()
     .size(12)
     .pepperoni(true)
     .mushrooms(true)
     .build();

(from Uli’s post), or

  Image* theImage =
    (new Image.Builder)->SetWidth(100)
    ->SetHeight(80)->SetDepth(8)->Build();

(from Klaas’ post)

I tried something like:

Foo * aFoo = [Foo fooWithData: @{
     @"width" : @21, @"height" : @22 }];

Here’s one way to implement that – there are multiple, clearly
(pardon the formatting, trying to fit into our narrow blog them is annoying):

// .h file
#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>

@interface Foo : NSObject

+ (instancetype) fooWithData: (NSDictionary*) initParams;

@end

// .m file
@interface Foo ()
@property (nonatomic, assign) long width;
@property (nonatomic, assign) long height;
@property (nonatomic, assign) long depth;
@end

@implementation Foo

+ (instancetype) fooWithData: (NSDictionary*) initParams
{
  Foo *result = [[Foo alloc] init];

  // If one uses setValue:forKey: in a loop as
  // as Uli notes then we can't support integral
  // properties like ints.
  // Also doing it explicitly as below
  // means we don't have to have the same name
  // for our private internal properties as we
  // document for our public parameters because
  // we can map them here.
  // e.g.,
  //  result.imageWidth = [initParams[@"width"] longValue];

  if ( initParams[@"width"] != nil )
    result.width = [initParams[@"width"] longValue];

  if ( initParams[@"height"] != nil )
    result.height = [initParams[@"height"] longValue];

  if ( initParams[@"depth"] != nil )
    result.depth = [initParams[@"depth"] longValue];

  return result;
}

- (instancetype) init
{
  self = [super init];
  if ( self )
  {
    // init with defaults
    _width = 10;
    _height = 10;
    _depth = 1;
  }
  return self;
}

- (NSString*) description
{
  return [NSString stringWithFormat:
           @"Foo: (%p), width: %ld, height: %ld, depth: %ld",
           self, self.width, self.height, self.depth];
}
@end

// main.m
#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
  @autoreleasepool {
      // note no depth specified, taking default of 1
    Foo * aFoo =
      [Foo fooWithData: @{ @"width" : @21, @"height" : @22 }];
    NSLog(@"aFoo: %@", aFoo );
  }
}

Paste the above into CodeRunner and run it and you get:

2014-04-12 16:22:38.918 Untitled 7[71144:707]
aFoo: Foo: (0x7f8842c0af00), width: 21, height: 22, depth: 1

In the above I only typed in the class method as taking the full parameter list but normally I would have made the init method take the same parameter and do the initialization & mapping there. Something I’d likely add if I was going to actually use this, which I’m not likely to. Why not? Because to use the construct above you’d have to document the parameter keys available to use in the dictionary and what type of value each takes. This is where ObjectiveC’s named parameters comes in handy: they are self documenting.

Anyway, an interesting procrastination from what I was supposed to be doing this Saturday afternoon…:-)

7DRL 2014 – Day 7: In which everything is complete

March 15, 2014 by

Trinkets – the roguelike game I’ve spent the past week creating for the 7DRL competition – is finished, about 20 hours before the deadline! It’s a game about wandering an extra dimensional vault, acquiring trinkets and trying to get back home.

A build for mac is available here. Unfortunately, there’s no windows/linux build, but if you’re on one of those operating systems and want to play, the source is available here.

Screen Shot 2014-03-15 at 2.38.31 PM

… which turns out to be entirely justified.

My high score is 59 – can you beat it? If so, let me know in the comments below!


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